Do Guns and Religion Promote Peace or War?

For several years now, we’ve heard debates about the second amendment. More recently, some folks have turned to international events to begin speaking about the first amendment. With such grandiose rights at stake, here’s something to ponder:

Second amendment advocates argue the claim to guns is an antiquated right that was meant for militia purposes and to oppose an oppressive government. There are those who adamantly believe the removal of guns from the landscape will prevent the increasing number of homicides and suicides. They suggest a citizenry, without the capability to shoot each other, will convene in a safer society. It is the guns, they say, which have no other purpose than to inflict death. To remove the means to kill would force criminals to use other weapons, ones, which could not inflict harm with the speed and effectiveness of a gun.

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Other second amendment advocates argue their claim to guns is one of the fundamental rights guaranteed in the Constitution. There are those who believe a landscape without guns makes the terrain susceptible to the whims of criminals who will not obey the gun laws. They suggest a citizenry without the capability to shoot criminals will not be able to protect itself from criminals who choose to disobey the gun laws. It is the guns, they say, which serve the purposes of protection. To remove the means to kill would subject us to the superior force of criminals who could then enter our houses without fear of retribution or retaliation.

And onward we go.

First amendment advocates argue the claim to freedom of religion is one of the fundamental rights guaranteed in the Constitution. There are those who adamantly believe the removal of a specific religion from the landscape would make all religions susceptible to the whims of a subjective government. They suggest a citizenry, without tolerance for all religions, is oppressive and discriminatory and against America’s core values. They suggest citizens are safer when freedom of religion is absolute. It is the religion, they say, which serves the purposes of diversity, and hope, and unity amongst believers. To remove the means of faith would subject those adherents to the religious values and tenants ofother, more accepted religions, which would destroy their own values and beliefs.

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Other first amendment advocates argue the claim to freedom of religion is unsuitable when the religious values are contrary to the fundamental principles of the nation’s foundation. There are those who believe removing a religion from the nation’s freedoms will prevent citizens from the death desired by those religious adherents. They suggest a citizenry, without the ability to adhere to certain religious tenants, will convene in a safer society. It is the religion, they say, which has no other purpose than to inflict death. To remove the means of faith would force adherents to use other means to spread their dogma, ones, which could not inflict death with the speed and effectiveness of religion-based dissemination.

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So where do you stand?

Is it the religion, which poses the problem, or is it the people who use the religion to inflict their will? Is it the gun, which poses the problem, or is it the people who use the gun to inflict their will? Are you consistent in your beliefs?

If we remove the item being used as the weapon, will we violate certain rights? Will society be safer?

Rainy days stimulate profound thought and it’s pouring outside. Hoping someday the sun will shine on a more peaceful world.  Until then, hugs for Kenya, Paris, Beirut, Baghdad and a hundred other places where peace bends and breaks before acts of atrocity.

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By ccxander

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